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To err is human nature but when it comes to getting money for college via scholarships, mistakes can cost you much needed financial help. You can increase your chances of obtaining a scholarship award by avoiding these common mistakes when applying for college scholarships.
Applying for only a couple of scholarships. The more scholarships for which you apply, the greater your chances are of receiving one. Don’t just apply for one or two scholarships and call it a day. Instead, review a variety of scholarships and apply to all of the ones in which you are eligible.
Avoiding the research. You won’t be successful in receiving a scholarship if you don’t take the time to research possible scholarship opportunities. From performing online searches to investigating unique contests and drawings, there are a variety of ways to find scholarships. You just have to put forth the time and effort.
Disregarding the instructions. Don’t miss out on a scholarship just because you didn’t read and follow the instructions. If the instructions ask for two recommendations and you only submit one, then you greatly decrease your chance of winning the scholarship. Likewise, if the instructions say that only online applications will be accepted and you send in a paper version, then your application will probably not be considered. Scholarship instructions are written for a reason, so follow them precisely.
Missing deadlines. Missing application deadlines is probably the most common mistake students make when applying for scholarships. Between application deadlines for colleges, financial aid, and scholarships, you have a multitude of dates to remember, which is why you need to plan ahead. Make a spreadsheet, use a planner, and set reminders so you don’t miss any priority deadlines.
Procrastinating. If you put off working on a scholarship application until the last minute, your application is likely to be filled with various mistakes because you had to rush through it. Avoid late-night cram sessions and give yourself plenty of time to complete each scholarship application thoroughly.
Skipping the proofreading process. Even if you take your time filling out the application and writing an essay, there may still be errors. So before you submit any scholarship application, take the time to proofread the entire application or ask a family member, friend, or mentor to proofread for you. Check for spelling mistakes, grammatical errors, omitted information, etc.
Submitting an illegible application. While most scholarships nowadays have online applications, there are still some that require paper applications. If you are submitting a paper application, make sure the writing is legible by either typing in the information or using neat handwriting. If your application is sloppy and illegible, the scholarship reviewer or committee will just move on to the next one.
Using an unprofessional email address. While a cute or risqué email address can seem clever among your group of friends, it can send the wrong message to a scholarship committee. When applying for scholarships, avoid email addresses that use nicknames or profanity and email addresses that are offensive or have sexual connotations. Instead, create a professional email address to use for scholarship applications (and college and employment applications). Keep it simple and straightforward by using variations of your first, middle, and last name.
Writing a subpar essay. If a scholarship has an essay requirement, then it is one of the most important parts of the application. A scholarship essay should be personal, intriguing, and well written. It should have a focus and be specific. It should make you stand out from other applicants. Use these tips for writing an exceptional scholarship essay.
For more information regarding college scholarships, check out the articles in the Scholarships & Grants section of this website.

To err is human nature but when it comes to getting money for college via scholarships, mistakes can cost you much needed financial help. You can increase your chances of obtaining a scholarship award by avoiding these common mistakes when applying for college scholarships.

Applying for only a couple of scholarships. The more scholarships for which you apply, the greater your chances are of receiving one. Don’t just apply for one or two scholarships and call it a day. Instead, review a variety of scholarships and apply to all of the ones in which you are eligible.

Avoiding the research. You won’t be successful in receiving a scholarship if you don’t take the time to research possible scholarship opportunities. From performing online searches to investigating unique contests and drawings, there are a variety of ways to find scholarships. You just have to put forth the time and effort.

Disregarding the instructions. Don’t miss out on a scholarship just because you didn’t read and follow the instructions. If the instructions ask for two recommendations and you only submit one, then you greatly decrease your chance of winning the scholarship. Likewise, if the instructions say that only online applications will be accepted and you send in a paper version, then your application will probably not be considered. Scholarship instructions are written for a reason, so follow them precisely.

Missing deadlines. Missing application deadlines is probably the most common mistake students make when applying for scholarships. Between application deadlines for colleges, financial aid, and scholarships, you have a multitude of dates to remember, which is why you need to plan ahead. Make a spreadsheet, use a planner, and set reminders so you don’t miss any priority deadlines.

Procrastinating. If you put off working on a scholarship application until the last minute, your application is likely to be filled with various mistakes because you had to rush through it. Avoid late-night cram sessions and give yourself plenty of time to complete each scholarship application thoroughly.

Skipping the proofreading process. Even if you take your time filling out the application and writing an essay, there may still be errors. So before you submit any scholarship application, take the time to proofread the entire application or ask a family member, friend, or mentor to proofread for you. Check for spelling mistakes, grammatical errors, omitted information, etc.

Submitting an illegible application. While most scholarships nowadays have online applications, there are still some that require paper applications. If you are submitting a paper application, make sure the writing is legible by either typing in the information or using neat handwriting. If your application is sloppy and illegible, the scholarship reviewer or committee will just move on to the next one.

Using an unprofessional email address. While a cute or risqué email address can seem clever among your group of friends, it can send the wrong message to a scholarship committee. When applying for scholarships, avoid email addresses that use nicknames or profanity and email addresses that are offensive or have sexual connotations. Instead, create a professional email address to use for scholarship applications (and college and employment applications). Keep it simple and straightforward by using variations of your first, middle, and last name.

Writing a subpar essay. If a scholarship has an essay requirement, then it is one of the most important parts of the application. A scholarship essay should be personal, intriguing, and well written. It should have a focus and be specific. It should make you stand out from other applicants. Use these tips for writing an exceptional scholarship essay.

For more information regarding college scholarships, check out the articles in the Scholarships & Grants section of this website.

Filed under scholarships scholarship mistakes

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Do your social networking profiles represent the kind of person that you would like to portray to college admissions officers? If not, you may want to make some changes. Recent studies show that more and more college admissions officers are turning to social networking sites to get information about prospective students. Check out these ways to let your social networking profiles work for (rather than against) you in the college admissions process.
Use the about section to your advantage. Use the about section on your accounts to showcase your individualism and appeal to college admissions officers. Include activities in which you are involved such as volunteering, fundraising for charities, playing sports, playing instruments, etc. Add your favorite books and movies. Keep the fun stuff but also add titles that will display your intellectual side. Hint: Consider books/movies that you have enjoyed from your high school English classes.
Display appropriate photos. Be smart with your posted and tagged photos. To really impress admissions officers, post photos that demonstrate your scholastic and extracurricular activities (i.e. don’t be embarrassed to post pictures of yourself at a recent awards ceremony or band recital). You can also post pictures of yourself hanging out with friends but be sure to choose ones that don’t incriminate you in any inappropriate or illegal activities. Ask your friends not to tag you in these kinds of pictures either. If you choose to display questionable photos (not recommended), change your privacy settings to where people whom you don’t want viewing your pictures can’t see them.
Censor your applications. If you use a site, such as Facebook, that features applications, be sure to censor your apps. There are many applications that are fun to use, but they sometimes display inappropriate content. Popular applications can occasionally have profanity-laden or offensive content. You want admissions counselors to view you in a positive light, so ditch any apps that are in poor taste.
Post content carefully. Be cautious about posting negative content on your social networking profiles, especially about the admissions process. Many admissions counselors look at your postings and may place more emphasis on what you write than even the pictures you display. Don’t bash the admissions process on your status updates and don’t have discussions with your friends via wall postings about which schools are better than others, etc. Doing so will only make you look pessimistic in the eyes of the admissions counselors.
Choose your “likes” and “follows” wisely. Obviously, you should like or follow the pages of the colleges that you are interested in attending. This will show that you are interested in the schools and their campus activities. In order to illustrate your diversity to college admissions officers, be sure to like or follow a variety of pages of your favorite activities, authors, music, etc. Avoid liking pages and posts that are offensive in any way.
Because most high school students have at least one (if not multiple) social networking account, it’s no wonder that college admissions officers use these sites to gather more information about applicants. College admissions is a very competitive process, so you should use every avenue to your advantage, including your social networking profiles. For more information about social networking etiquette, check out Social Networking Sites: Etiquette and Safety.

Do your social networking profiles represent the kind of person that you would like to portray to college admissions officers? If not, you may want to make some changes. Recent studies show that more and more college admissions officers are turning to social networking sites to get information about prospective students. Check out these ways to let your social networking profiles work for (rather than against) you in the college admissions process.

Use the about section to your advantage. Use the about section on your accounts to showcase your individualism and appeal to college admissions officers. Include activities in which you are involved such as volunteering, fundraising for charities, playing sports, playing instruments, etc. Add your favorite books and movies. Keep the fun stuff but also add titles that will display your intellectual side. Hint: Consider books/movies that you have enjoyed from your high school English classes.

Display appropriate photos. Be smart with your posted and tagged photos. To really impress admissions officers, post photos that demonstrate your scholastic and extracurricular activities (i.e. don’t be embarrassed to post pictures of yourself at a recent awards ceremony or band recital). You can also post pictures of yourself hanging out with friends but be sure to choose ones that don’t incriminate you in any inappropriate or illegal activities. Ask your friends not to tag you in these kinds of pictures either. If you choose to display questionable photos (not recommended), change your privacy settings to where people whom you don’t want viewing your pictures can’t see them.

Censor your applications. If you use a site, such as Facebook, that features applications, be sure to censor your apps. There are many applications that are fun to use, but they sometimes display inappropriate content. Popular applications can occasionally have profanity-laden or offensive content. You want admissions counselors to view you in a positive light, so ditch any apps that are in poor taste.

Post content carefully. Be cautious about posting negative content on your social networking profiles, especially about the admissions process. Many admissions counselors look at your postings and may place more emphasis on what you write than even the pictures you display. Don’t bash the admissions process on your status updates and don’t have discussions with your friends via wall postings about which schools are better than others, etc. Doing so will only make you look pessimistic in the eyes of the admissions counselors.

Choose your “likes” and “follows” wisely. Obviously, you should like or follow the pages of the colleges that you are interested in attending. This will show that you are interested in the schools and their campus activities. In order to illustrate your diversity to college admissions officers, be sure to like or follow a variety of pages of your favorite activities, authors, music, etc. Avoid liking pages and posts that are offensive in any way.

Because most high school students have at least one (if not multiple) social networking account, it’s no wonder that college admissions officers use these sites to gather more information about applicants. College admissions is a very competitive process, so you should use every avenue to your advantage, including your social networking profiles. For more information about social networking etiquette, check out Social Networking Sites: Etiquette and Safety.

(Source: ecampustours.com)

Filed under high school college admissions social networking

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When applying for admission to college or applying for a job, it is crucial to present yourself in a professional manner. While your email address may seem insignificant in the overall process of receiving admittance to a college or obtaining a job, it is actually a factor that some college admission officers and human resources personnel take into consideration. Here’s how to create a professional email address for college admission applications and employment applications/resumes.
Avoid Cutesy or Risqué While a cute or risqué email address can seem clever among your group of friends, it can send the wrong message to college admission officers and HR personnel. Avoid email addresses that use nicknames or profanity and email addresses that are offensive or have sexual connotations. It may seem like common sense, but both college admission officers and HR personnel have reported seeing those kinds of email addresses on applications. Consider the following email addresses:
iluvalcohol@hostname onedirection4ever@hostname ladiesman@hostname jpop69@hostname spacecadet@hostname thenextkimkardashian@hostname sleepin247@hostname evilgoddess@hostname
Not only do the above emails come off as juvenile, but a few of them would also make college admission officers and HR personnel question your character. For instance, iluvalcohol may raise concerns about alcohol abuse, and sleepin247 may raise concerns about laziness and procrastination. Perhaps it seems fastidious, but avoiding cutesy or risqué email addresses is best practice when applying for college admission or a job position. Otherwise, you will appear immature and prove that your attention to detail is lacking.
Choose Simple and Straightforward When creating a professional email address, keep it simple and straightforward. Use variations of your first, middle, and last name. Here are some ideas to guide you:
john.smith@hostname john_smith@hostname jsmith@hostname johns@hostname johnraysmith@hostname john.ray.smith@hostname john.r.smith@hostname j.r.smith@hostname smith.john@hostname smith.j@hostname smith.j.r@hostname
Taking a little time to think about how your email looks from the standpoint of the recipient can go a long way toward presenting a professional image. It’s fine to have a cutesy email address for personal use among your family and friends, but be sure to create a professional email address before you begin filling out college admission applications or applying for employment.

When applying for admission to college or applying for a job, it is crucial to present yourself in a professional manner. While your email address may seem insignificant in the overall process of receiving admittance to a college or obtaining a job, it is actually a factor that some college admission officers and human resources personnel take into consideration. Here’s how to create a professional email address for college admission applications and employment applications/resumes.

Avoid Cutesy or Risqué
While a cute or risqué email address can seem clever among your group of friends, it can send the wrong message to college admission officers and HR personnel. Avoid email addresses that use nicknames or profanity and email addresses that are offensive or have sexual connotations. It may seem like common sense, but both college admission officers and HR personnel have reported seeing those kinds of email addresses on applications. Consider the following email addresses:

iluvalcohol@hostname
onedirection4ever@hostname
ladiesman@hostname
jpop69@hostname
spacecadet@hostname
thenextkimkardashian@hostname
sleepin247@hostname
evilgoddess@hostname

Not only do the above emails come off as juvenile, but a few of them would also make college admission officers and HR personnel question your character. For instance, iluvalcohol may raise concerns about alcohol abuse, and sleepin247 may raise concerns about laziness and procrastination. Perhaps it seems fastidious, but avoiding cutesy or risqué email addresses is best practice when applying for college admission or a job position. Otherwise, you will appear immature and prove that your attention to detail is lacking.

Choose Simple and Straightforward
When creating a professional email address, keep it simple and straightforward. Use variations of your first, middle, and last name. Here are some ideas to guide you:

john.smith@hostname
john_smith@hostname
jsmith@hostname
johns@hostname
johnraysmith@hostname
john.ray.smith@hostname
john.r.smith@hostname
j.r.smith@hostname
smith.john@hostname
smith.j@hostname
smith.j.r@hostname

Taking a little time to think about how your email looks from the standpoint of the recipient can go a long way toward presenting a professional image. It’s fine to have a cutesy email address for personal use among your family and friends, but be sure to create a professional email address before you begin filling out college admission applications or applying for employment.

(Source: ecampustours.com)

Filed under college email address

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College can be a stressful time for many entering freshmen. From being away from home for the first time to meeting new people, there are many factors that can cause you to become stressed during your first year of college. And as a result of being stressed, you may begin to pack on a few pounds. Follow these tips to beat the freshman 15 and remain healthy throughout your college years.
Keep a balanced diet. Eat healthy foods from the five food groups: grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meats/protein-based foods. Be sure to eat three meals a day. Never skip breakfast because it gives you the energy to get through the morning.
Control your portion size. Eating smaller portions of food can help you maintain your weight. When eating at a restaurant, share your entrée with a friend or save some food to take home for another meal. Don’t go back for seconds at your school’s all-you-can-eat cafeteria. Don’t super-size your meal when eating fast food.
Stock your dorm room with healthy snacks. Keep sweets at a minimum. Instead, opt for healthier snacks, such as nuts, veggies, fruits, greek yogurt, etc. Tell your mom to leave the chocolate chip cookies out of the care packages; ask her to send a fruit basket instead.
Keep a food journal. If you are really worried about gaining extra weight, download a food journal or calorie counter app on your phone or tablet. These apps will allow you to keep track of how many calories you consume in a day. Record everything you eat and drink each day and adjust your calorie intake to your findings.
Avoid alcohol. Excessive alcohol consumption will make you gain weight quickly. One beer contains about 150 calories. If you do decide to drink (and meet the age requirement), put a limit on how much you intake.
Drink water. Water is a non-caloric drink, and it keeps you well hydrated. Drinking water instead of sodas and sweetened beverages will help you avoid those unwanted calories. Try to drink at least eight glasses of water each day.
Keep late nights to a minimum. If you stay up all night studying, partying, etc., you will be more likely to crave a midnight snack. Your unhealthy friends (who haven’t read this article) will talk you into ordering a pizza at 1am, and then you’ll regret it come morning.
Exercise. You may find it hard to cram exercising into your busy college schedule, but it is essential in keeping the weight off. Try to visit the campus gym three times a week or do yoga in your dorm room. If you don’t like a routine workout, grab some of your friends for a brisk walk around campus, a swim in the campus pool, or a bike ride around the park. You have to stay active in order to burn off those excess calories.
Get enough sleep. Sleep deprivation can often lead to weight gain because you consume more caffeinated foods and beverages in order to make up for the lack of sleep. Try to get at least seven or eight hours of sleep each night, so you will have an energized morning without the caffeine boost.
Gaining weight in college is common. However, if you follow the above-mentioned tips, then you should beat the freshman 15 and stay healthy all through college.

College can be a stressful time for many entering freshmen. From being away from home for the first time to meeting new people, there are many factors that can cause you to become stressed during your first year of college. And as a result of being stressed, you may begin to pack on a few pounds. Follow these tips to beat the freshman 15 and remain healthy throughout your college years.

Keep a balanced diet. Eat healthy foods from the five food groups: grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meats/protein-based foods. Be sure to eat three meals a day. Never skip breakfast because it gives you the energy to get through the morning.

Control your portion size. Eating smaller portions of food can help you maintain your weight. When eating at a restaurant, share your entrée with a friend or save some food to take home for another meal. Don’t go back for seconds at your school’s all-you-can-eat cafeteria. Don’t super-size your meal when eating fast food.

Stock your dorm room with healthy snacks. Keep sweets at a minimum. Instead, opt for healthier snacks, such as nuts, veggies, fruits, greek yogurt, etc. Tell your mom to leave the chocolate chip cookies out of the care packages; ask her to send a fruit basket instead.

Keep a food journal. If you are really worried about gaining extra weight, download a food journal or calorie counter app on your phone or tablet. These apps will allow you to keep track of how many calories you consume in a day. Record everything you eat and drink each day and adjust your calorie intake to your findings.

Avoid alcohol. Excessive alcohol consumption will make you gain weight quickly. One beer contains about 150 calories. If you do decide to drink (and meet the age requirement), put a limit on how much you intake.

Drink water. Water is a non-caloric drink, and it keeps you well hydrated. Drinking water instead of sodas and sweetened beverages will help you avoid those unwanted calories. Try to drink at least eight glasses of water each day.

Keep late nights to a minimum. If you stay up all night studying, partying, etc., you will be more likely to crave a midnight snack. Your unhealthy friends (who haven’t read this article) will talk you into ordering a pizza at 1am, and then you’ll regret it come morning.

Exercise. You may find it hard to cram exercising into your busy college schedule, but it is essential in keeping the weight off. Try to visit the campus gym three times a week or do yoga in your dorm room. If you don’t like a routine workout, grab some of your friends for a brisk walk around campus, a swim in the campus pool, or a bike ride around the park. You have to stay active in order to burn off those excess calories.

Get enough sleep. Sleep deprivation can often lead to weight gain because you consume more caffeinated foods and beverages in order to make up for the lack of sleep. Try to get at least seven or eight hours of sleep each night, so you will have an energized morning without the caffeine boost.

Gaining weight in college is common. However, if you follow the above-mentioned tips, then you should beat the freshman 15 and stay healthy all through college.

(Source: ecampustours.com)

Filed under college freshman 15 healthy eating

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Building a positive reputation in the workplace is crucial for ensuring continued success and advancement. A positive career reputation can lead to perks such as better assignments, increased raises or bonuses, and special promotions. Here are ways to build a positive reputation in your career.
Keep a positive attitude. Having a positive attitude in the workplace is fundamental for your reputation. No one wants to work with someone who is always grumpy or pessimistic. To keep a positive attitude, you should always smile and be pleasant. Have an open mind to new ideas and a willingness to try different initiatives. This will make you more approachable to others.
Earn respect before asking for a special request. If you have just graduated and are starting out in your career or if you have been working for a while but just landed a new position, you need to earn respect from your boss before you make any special requests. Don’t go into a new job expecting perks and benefits within the first year. If you first prove to your boss that you perform your job well, then he may acknowledge that it’s worthwhile to keep you content and should be more willing to grant your request, be it a flex schedule, vacation time, or a raise.
Be reliable and trustworthy. Completing tasks in a timely manner, being punctual, and adhering to business procedures will prove to your superiors and colleagues that you are a reliable employee. If you can demonstrate these traits with your actions, you will be well on your way to acceptability and good human relations in any business.
Deliver quality work. Always strive to exceed expectations in your work assignments. Pay close attention to details and make the quality of your work your first priority. Everyone can work fast, but not everyone can deliver quality work with few mistakes.
Take initiative. Showing initiative on the job will benefit your reputation. If you have a suggestion that will improve business processes, tell your supervisor. If you know that a task needs to be completed, don’t wait on your boss to tell you to do it before you get started on the project. Employers value workers who take initiative for the betterment of the organization.
Learn how to function as part of a team. In the workplace, you will often be required to work with colleagues in a team environment in order to accomplish important tasks. To be a good team player, you should put the team goals ahead of your own individual situation. Meet your deadlines so you don’t hold up everyone else. Learn how to adapt with team members who are in different locations. Take the time to understand and appreciate team members whose work style is different from yours. Be a team player and others will be sure to notice.
Take responsibility. Making mistakes is human nature, so there is no doubt that you will make errors while on the job. While it’s no fun to fess up and take responsibility when you have made a mistake, your reputation will definitely take a hit if you try to cover it up. Accept responsibility when necessary and make every effort to fix your blunders.
Be careful with social networking sites. Social networking sites can lead to serious oversharing of information, which can affect your professional reputation. Avoid posting unfavorable comments about your job or boss. Don’t post photos that portray you in a negative light, such as pictures from that party where you consumed too much alcohol. If you post unflattering comments and photos, your colleagues will be sure to lose their confidence in your ability to use sound judgment on the job.
Connect with mentors. Having people on your side in the workplace is important for your career reputation. So connect with your mentors and build relationships with your co-workers to make work more enjoyable and to be kept in mind for special projects and promotions.
Reputations can create or destroy opportunities in the workplace, so make every effort to build a positive one. For more information about transitioning into a new job, read First Year on the Job.

Building a positive reputation in the workplace is crucial for ensuring continued success and advancement. A positive career reputation can lead to perks such as better assignments, increased raises or bonuses, and special promotions. Here are ways to build a positive reputation in your career.

Keep a positive attitude. Having a positive attitude in the workplace is fundamental for your reputation. No one wants to work with someone who is always grumpy or pessimistic. To keep a positive attitude, you should always smile and be pleasant. Have an open mind to new ideas and a willingness to try different initiatives. This will make you more approachable to others.

Earn respect before asking for a special request. If you have just graduated and are starting out in your career or if you have been working for a while but just landed a new position, you need to earn respect from your boss before you make any special requests. Don’t go into a new job expecting perks and benefits within the first year. If you first prove to your boss that you perform your job well, then he may acknowledge that it’s worthwhile to keep you content and should be more willing to grant your request, be it a flex schedule, vacation time, or a raise.

Be reliable and trustworthy. Completing tasks in a timely manner, being punctual, and adhering to business procedures will prove to your superiors and colleagues that you are a reliable employee. If you can demonstrate these traits with your actions, you will be well on your way to acceptability and good human relations in any business.

Deliver quality work. Always strive to exceed expectations in your work assignments. Pay close attention to details and make the quality of your work your first priority. Everyone can work fast, but not everyone can deliver quality work with few mistakes.

Take initiative. Showing initiative on the job will benefit your reputation. If you have a suggestion that will improve business processes, tell your supervisor. If you know that a task needs to be completed, don’t wait on your boss to tell you to do it before you get started on the project. Employers value workers who take initiative for the betterment of the organization.

Learn how to function as part of a team. In the workplace, you will often be required to work with colleagues in a team environment in order to accomplish important tasks. To be a good team player, you should put the team goals ahead of your own individual situation. Meet your deadlines so you don’t hold up everyone else. Learn how to adapt with team members who are in different locations. Take the time to understand and appreciate team members whose work style is different from yours. Be a team player and others will be sure to notice.

Take responsibility. Making mistakes is human nature, so there is no doubt that you will make errors while on the job. While it’s no fun to fess up and take responsibility when you have made a mistake, your reputation will definitely take a hit if you try to cover it up. Accept responsibility when necessary and make every effort to fix your blunders.

Be careful with social networking sites. Social networking sites can lead to serious oversharing of information, which can affect your professional reputation. Avoid posting unfavorable comments about your job or boss. Don’t post photos that portray you in a negative light, such as pictures from that party where you consumed too much alcohol. If you post unflattering comments and photos, your colleagues will be sure to lose their confidence in your ability to use sound judgment on the job.

Connect with mentors. Having people on your side in the workplace is important for your career reputation. So connect with your mentors and build relationships with your co-workers to make work more enjoyable and to be kept in mind for special projects and promotions.

Reputations can create or destroy opportunities in the workplace, so make every effort to build a positive one. For more information about transitioning into a new job, read First Year on the Job.

(Source: ecampustours.com)

Filed under career career planning

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For occupational purposes, Merriam Webster defines networking as the cultivation of productive relationships for employment. Learning how to properly network is a skill that will immensely benefit your future career. You may think that you don’t need to develop professional contacts until you have graduated from college and begin searching for a job. However, the earlier you learn how to network and begin the networking process, the greater your networking circle will be and the more employment options you may have. Use these suggestions to learn how to network in high school.
Expand your social circle. High school students are notorious for staying within their own clique of friends. However, in order to network properly in the future, you will need to learn how to approach strangers. Try sitting with different groups of people during lunch to get to know them better. Strike up a conversation with that shy student in your math class. Try out for a sports team or join a club to meet new people. Now and in the future, the more people you know, the better chances you will have to find employment.
Be nice to everyone. Likeability is a huge factor in the hiring process, so it’s imperative that you learn how to project a pleasant, helpful, and positive persona. In high school, you should hone this persona by being nice to all of your classmates. Lend a helpful hand to others when needed, avoid bully-type behavior, and smile at your peers as you pass in the hallways. Portraying this type of behavior will make you a more likeable person among your classmates (as you never know which of your peers may be able to assist with your career in the future) and will help prepare you for networking in the professional world.
Become involved in activities outside of high school. Students often forget that life exists outside of high school. Even though you have a busy school schedule, try to make time for activities outside of school in order to expand your horizons and increase the number of people that you meet on an everyday basis. Consider volunteering at a homeless or animal shelter, becoming involved in community sporting activities, joining a church youth group, etc. Try to remember this tip when you begin your career as well. Adults often become so immersed in their work and company culture that they forget that there is a whole world of professional networks to tap into.
Obtain a part-time job or internship. For high school students, the value of a part-time job or internship is tremendous, both in terms of acquiring essential skills and developing professional contacts. If you make good impressions working at your part-time jobs or internships, employers may keep you in mind for future full-time positions after you complete your education. Never leave a job or internship on bad terms, and try to keep in touch with co-workers and supervisors along the way in order to keep that networking dialogue open.
Use parents as resources. Your parents and the parents of your friends have years of networking experience, so be sure to ask for their guidance. They should be more than willing to share their expertise with you and maybe even their contacts. By asking questions and tapping into their knowledge base during high school, you should be thoroughly prepared for professional networking and have a substantial contact list by the time college graduation rolls around.
Create a LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn is a career-based social networking site. As a high school student, you should create a LinkedIn account to become familiar with the site and begin building an online professional contact list. It’s also an easy way to keep track of all of your accomplishments. Your profile should include a professional picture and details of your educational experience, internships, part-time jobs, volunteer work, and honors/awards. Connect with anyone that you have ever met, such as your classmates, teachers, coaches, mentors, co-workers, etc. Join any networking groups that may help you along the way, such as school groups or specific city/county groups.
Networking is the key to staying connected and aware of job opportunities. Learning how to network early in life will only benefit your career and open more doors for you through the years.

For occupational purposes, Merriam Webster defines networking as the cultivation of productive relationships for employment. Learning how to properly network is a skill that will immensely benefit your future career. You may think that you don’t need to develop professional contacts until you have graduated from college and begin searching for a job. However, the earlier you learn how to network and begin the networking process, the greater your networking circle will be and the more employment options you may have. Use these suggestions to learn how to network in high school.

Expand your social circle. High school students are notorious for staying within their own clique of friends. However, in order to network properly in the future, you will need to learn how to approach strangers. Try sitting with different groups of people during lunch to get to know them better. Strike up a conversation with that shy student in your math class. Try out for a sports team or join a club to meet new people. Now and in the future, the more people you know, the better chances you will have to find employment.

Be nice to everyone. Likeability is a huge factor in the hiring process, so it’s imperative that you learn how to project a pleasant, helpful, and positive persona. In high school, you should hone this persona by being nice to all of your classmates. Lend a helpful hand to others when needed, avoid bully-type behavior, and smile at your peers as you pass in the hallways. Portraying this type of behavior will make you a more likeable person among your classmates (as you never know which of your peers may be able to assist with your career in the future) and will help prepare you for networking in the professional world.

Become involved in activities outside of high school. Students often forget that life exists outside of high school. Even though you have a busy school schedule, try to make time for activities outside of school in order to expand your horizons and increase the number of people that you meet on an everyday basis. Consider volunteering at a homeless or animal shelter, becoming involved in community sporting activities, joining a church youth group, etc. Try to remember this tip when you begin your career as well. Adults often become so immersed in their work and company culture that they forget that there is a whole world of professional networks to tap into.

Obtain a part-time job or internship. For high school students, the value of a part-time job or internship is tremendous, both in terms of acquiring essential skills and developing professional contacts. If you make good impressions working at your part-time jobs or internships, employers may keep you in mind for future full-time positions after you complete your education. Never leave a job or internship on bad terms, and try to keep in touch with co-workers and supervisors along the way in order to keep that networking dialogue open.

Use parents as resources. Your parents and the parents of your friends have years of networking experience, so be sure to ask for their guidance. They should be more than willing to share their expertise with you and maybe even their contacts. By asking questions and tapping into their knowledge base during high school, you should be thoroughly prepared for professional networking and have a substantial contact list by the time college graduation rolls around.

Create a LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn is a career-based social networking site. As a high school student, you should create a LinkedIn account to become familiar with the site and begin building an online professional contact list. It’s also an easy way to keep track of all of your accomplishments. Your profile should include a professional picture and details of your educational experience, internships, part-time jobs, volunteer work, and honors/awards. Connect with anyone that you have ever met, such as your classmates, teachers, coaches, mentors, co-workers, etc. Join any networking groups that may help you along the way, such as school groups or specific city/county groups.

Networking is the key to staying connected and aware of job opportunities. Learning how to network early in life will only benefit your career and open more doors for you through the years.

(Source: ecampustours.com)

Filed under networking high school

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Scholarships can be found in a variety of places. You just have to take the time to look. Use these methods to find scholarship opportunities to help with your higher education expenses.
Before you read any further, review the contest rules and register right now for the $1,000 Scholarship Giveaway from eCampusTours.
Perform online scholarship searches. Online scholarship searches, such as the one provided on eCampusTours, are research tools that can help you find leads on potential scholarships for which you may want to apply. Because there are numerous scholarship searches available online, you have to make sure to use the ones that are legit and reliable. When utilizing online scholarship searches, make sure the service is free, the scholarship information provided is up-do-date, and the company providing the service does not sell, lease, or rent your information to third parties.
Obtain a scholarship reference book. Printed scholarship directories can be very helpful in your scholarship search. Visit your local library or bookstore and pick up the latest edition of a scholarship reference book. Be sure to choose a book that gives detailed descriptions of the requirements, award amounts, etc.
Utilize an Internet search engine. You may be pretty amazed by the amount of scholarships you can find just by using a search engine like Google or GoodSearch. The key is to search for very specific scholarship criteria. Don’t just type in “scholarships.” Think about your hobbies, extracurricular activities, physical characteristics, etc. and implement those into your search. For example, if one of your hobbies is skateboarding, try searching “scholarships for skateboarders.” Or if you suffer from allergies, search “scholarships for people with allergies.” You get the picture. Just think outside the box because you never know what you may find.
Ask your high school counselor. If you are still in high school, drop by the counseling office and inquire about scholarships. Your counselor should have a lot of information about local scholarships because scholarship sponsors often send out updates and announcements to nearby high schools. You should speak with your counselor early in the school year so he/she will be able to keep a look-out on any scholarships in which you may qualify. Be sure to give your counselor information about your extracurricular activities/talents and your family’s financial background.
Make inquiries at your college. If you are in college or know which college you would like to attend, be sure to find out what kind of scholarships are offered through the school. You should speak with someone in your academic department to find out if scholarships specific to your major are available. You should also contact the school’s financial aid office. A financial aid advisor will be able to help you learn whether you are eligible for any need-based scholarships or grants awarded directly from the school. College websites can also be very helpful. Look for scholarship information on the admissions and financial aid sections of the websites.
Research organizations and clubs in which you have been involved. What kind of organizations have you been involved with at school? National Honor Society? Future Business Leaders of America? Key Club? A sorority or fraternity? These types of organizations often offer educational scholarships to their members. Think about all of the extracurricular activities in which you are involved and then research the websites of those organizations.
Check with your employer. Do you have a part-time job? Many companies offer scholarship opportunities to their employees. For instance, companies such as McDonald’s, Walmart, and Cracker Barrel all offer scholarship opportunities for employees. Speak with someone in your HR department to see if scholarships are offered through your place of employment.
Tap into your parents’ network. You may be able to find scholarships through your parents’ network. Many companies and organizations often award scholarships to the children of their employees or members. Be sure to check with your parents’ place of employment as well as with any organizations or clubs to which your parents belong.
Check with local and national businesses. Many small businesses like to give back to their community via scholarship opportunities for students. Check with your city’s Chamber of Commerce for a list of local businesses and then visit their websites or place a phone call to see if these companies offer any scholarships. Large companies, like Coca-Cola, also offer scholarship awards so be sure to include national businesses during your search.
Contact community service organizations and civic groups. Service organizations and civic groups often hold fundraisers in their communities in order to offer scholarships to local students. Make some calls to your local Kiwanis club, Lions club, Jaycees, church, synagogue, mosque, etc. to inquire about available scholarships. Most community groups sponsor scholarships that are open to all students who live in the area so you usually don’t have to be a member of the organization to apply.
As you can see, there is a multitude of ways to find scholarship opportunities. You just have to put forth a little effort. Before you begin your scholarship search, be sure to read Steps For Getting a Scholarship and Watch Out For Scholarship Scams.

Scholarships can be found in a variety of places. You just have to take the time to look. Use these methods to find scholarship opportunities to help with your higher education expenses.

Before you read any further, review the contest rules and register right now for the $1,000 Scholarship Giveaway from eCampusTours.

Perform online scholarship searches. Online scholarship searches, such as the one provided on eCampusTours, are research tools that can help you find leads on potential scholarships for which you may want to apply. Because there are numerous scholarship searches available online, you have to make sure to use the ones that are legit and reliable. When utilizing online scholarship searches, make sure the service is free, the scholarship information provided is up-do-date, and the company providing the service does not sell, lease, or rent your information to third parties.

Obtain a scholarship reference book. Printed scholarship directories can be very helpful in your scholarship search. Visit your local library or bookstore and pick up the latest edition of a scholarship reference book. Be sure to choose a book that gives detailed descriptions of the requirements, award amounts, etc.

Utilize an Internet search engine. You may be pretty amazed by the amount of scholarships you can find just by using a search engine like Google or GoodSearch. The key is to search for very specific scholarship criteria. Don’t just type in “scholarships.” Think about your hobbies, extracurricular activities, physical characteristics, etc. and implement those into your search. For example, if one of your hobbies is skateboarding, try searching “scholarships for skateboarders.” Or if you suffer from allergies, search “scholarships for people with allergies.” You get the picture. Just think outside the box because you never know what you may find.

Ask your high school counselor. If you are still in high school, drop by the counseling office and inquire about scholarships. Your counselor should have a lot of information about local scholarships because scholarship sponsors often send out updates and announcements to nearby high schools. You should speak with your counselor early in the school year so he/she will be able to keep a look-out on any scholarships in which you may qualify. Be sure to give your counselor information about your extracurricular activities/talents and your family’s financial background.

Make inquiries at your college. If you are in college or know which college you would like to attend, be sure to find out what kind of scholarships are offered through the school. You should speak with someone in your academic department to find out if scholarships specific to your major are available. You should also contact the school’s financial aid office. A financial aid advisor will be able to help you learn whether you are eligible for any need-based scholarships or grants awarded directly from the school. College websites can also be very helpful. Look for scholarship information on the admissions and financial aid sections of the websites.

Research organizations and clubs in which you have been involved. What kind of organizations have you been involved with at school? National Honor Society? Future Business Leaders of America? Key Club? A sorority or fraternity? These types of organizations often offer educational scholarships to their members. Think about all of the extracurricular activities in which you are involved and then research the websites of those organizations.

Check with your employer. Do you have a part-time job? Many companies offer scholarship opportunities to their employees. For instance, companies such as McDonald’s, Walmart, and Cracker Barrel all offer scholarship opportunities for employees. Speak with someone in your HR department to see if scholarships are offered through your place of employment.

Tap into your parents’ network. You may be able to find scholarships through your parents’ network. Many companies and organizations often award scholarships to the children of their employees or members. Be sure to check with your parents’ place of employment as well as with any organizations or clubs to which your parents belong.

Check with local and national businesses. Many small businesses like to give back to their community via scholarship opportunities for students. Check with your city’s Chamber of Commerce for a list of local businesses and then visit their websites or place a phone call to see if these companies offer any scholarships. Large companies, like Coca-Cola, also offer scholarship awards so be sure to include national businesses during your search.

Contact community service organizations and civic groups. Service organizations and civic groups often hold fundraisers in their communities in order to offer scholarships to local students. Make some calls to your local Kiwanis club, Lions club, Jaycees, church, synagogue, mosque, etc. to inquire about available scholarships. Most community groups sponsor scholarships that are open to all students who live in the area so you usually don’t have to be a member of the organization to apply.

As you can see, there is a multitude of ways to find scholarship opportunities. You just have to put forth a little effort. Before you begin your scholarship search, be sure to read Steps For Getting a Scholarship and Watch Out For Scholarship Scams.

(Source: ecampustours.com)

Filed under scholarships high school college